Compazine mental disorders

How long is it safe to take prochlorperazine? You may need to take the drug for 12 to 24 hours to determine if it is effective. After prolonged or high dose therapy, there can be symptoms with sudden withdrawal. This can be avoided by gradual dose reduction. Otherwise, there are no known problems with long-term use.

How about side effects? Adverse reactions can occur with any drug, even over-the-counter medications. If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly. Do not share this medication with others. Consult your doctor for more details.

If you are taking this medication on a prescribed schedule and miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up. Store vials below 86 degrees F 30 degrees C away from light and moisture. Keep all medicines away from children and pets. Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so.

Phenothiazines can produce alpha-adrenergic blockade. Thiazide diuretics may accentuate the orthostatic hypotension that may occur with phenothiazines. Antihypertensive effects of guanethidine and related compounds may be counteracted when phenothiazines are used concomitantly.

Concomitant administration of propranolol with phenothiazines results in increased plasma levels of both drugs. Phenothiazines may lower the convulsive threshold; dosage adjustments of anticonvulsants may be necessary.

Potentiation of anticonvulsant effects does not occur. The presence of phenothiazines may produce false-positive phenylketonuria PKU test results. Long-Term Therapy Given the likelihood that some patients exposed chronically to antipsychotics will develop tardive dyskinesia, it is advised that all patients in whom chronic use is contemplated be given, if possible, full information about this risk.

Children with acute illnesses e. In such patients, the drug should be used only under close supervision. As with other phenothiazine derivatives, prochlorperazine should be discontinued at least 48 hours before myelography, should not be resumed for at least 24 hours postprocedure, and should not be used for the control of nausea and vomiting occurring either prior to myelography with Amipaque metrizamide , or postprocedure. Patients with neutropenia should be carefully monitored for fever or other symptoms or signs of infection and treated promptly if such symptoms or signs occur.

Geriatric Use Clinical studies of prochlorperazine did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether elderly subjects respond differently from younger subjects. Geriatric patients are more sensitive to the side effects of antipsychotics, including prochlorperazine. Also, postmarketing safety experience suggests that the incidence of agranulocytosis may be higher in geriatric patients compared to younger individuals who received prochlorperazine.

Adverse Reactions Drowsiness, dizziness, amenorrhea, blurred vision, skin reactions and hypotension may occur. Cholestatic jaundice has occurred. If fever with grippe-like symptoms occurs, appropriate liver studies should be conducted. If tests indicate an abnormality, stop treatment. There have been a few observations of fatty changes in the livers of patients who have died while receiving the drug.

No causal relationship has been established. Leukopenia and agranulocytosis have occurred. Warn patients to report the sudden appearance of sore throat or other signs of infection. If white blood cell and differential counts indicate leukocyte depression, stop treatment and start antibiotic and other suitable therapy.

Extrapyramidal Reactions These symptoms are seen in a significant number of hospitalized mental patients. They may be characterized by motor restlessness, be of the dystonic type, or they may resemble parkinsonism. Depending on the severity of symptoms, dosage should be reduced or discontinued. If therapy is reinstituted, it should be at a lower dosage. Should these symptoms occur in children or pregnant patients, the drug should be stopped and not reinstituted.

In most cases barbiturates by suitable route of administration will suffice. In more severe cases, the administration of an anti-parkinsonism agent, except levodopa see PDR , usually produces rapid reversal of symptoms.

Suitable supportive measures such as maintaining a clear airway and adequate hydration should be employed. Dystonia Class effect Symptoms of dystonia, prolonged abnormal contractions of muscle groups, may occur in susceptible individuals during the first few days of treatment. While these symptoms can occur at low doses, they occur more frequently and with greater severity with high potency and at higher doses of first generation antipsychotic drugs. An elevated risk of acute dystonia is observed in males and younger age groups.

Motor Restlessness Symptoms may include agitation or jitteriness and sometimes insomnia. Children 2 to 12 years of age—2. However, for children 2 through 5 years of age, the dose usually is not more than 20 mg a day. For children 6 to 12 years of age, the dose usually is not more than 25 mg a day. Children up to 2 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor. Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg three or four times a day. Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor.

The usual dose is 2. Adults and teenagers—At first, 10 to 20 mg injected into a muscle. Later, the dose is usually 10 to 20 mg every four to six hours.

Children 2 to 12 years of age—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. However, the dose for children 2 through 5 years of age usually is not more than 20 mg a day.

The dose for children 6 to 12 years of age usually is not more than 25 mg a day. Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg, injected into a muscle every three to four hours as needed. The dose usually is not more than 40 mg a day. For nausea and vomiting in surgery: Adults and teenagers—5 to 10 mg, injected into a muscle or injected slowly into a vein. However, the total dose usually is not more than 40 mg a day. Adults and teenagers—10 mg inserted into the rectum three or four times a day.

Adults and teenagers—25 mg inserted into the rectum two times a day. For promazine For injection dosage form: Adults—At first, 50 to mg, injected into a muscle or, in hospitalized patients, diluted and injected into a vein. Later, 10 to mg, injected into a muscle every four to six hours.

Children 12 years of age and older—10 to 25 mg, injected into a muscle, every four to six hours. Adults and teenagers—At first, 5 milligrams mg a day. Children 11 years of age and older—At first, a total of 1 to 3 mg a day taken all at one time in a single dose each day or divided and taken in smaller doses several times during the day. Children 3 through 10 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor. For oral dosage forms suspension, solution, or tablets: Adults and teenagers—At first, 50 to milligrams mg one to three times a day.

Children 2 to 12 years of age—At first, 10 to 25 mg two or three times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose, if needed, based on body weight or size.

For oral dosage forms syrup or tablets: Adults and teenagers—At first, 2 to 5 milligrams mg one or two times a day. Children 6 to 12 years of age—At first, 1 mg one or two times a day. Children up to 6 years of age—Dose must be determined by your doctor.

Continued Other, less common types of mental illnesses include: Stress response syndromes formerly called adjustment disorders: Stress response syndromes occur when a person develops emotional or behavioral symptoms in response to a stressful event or situation. The stressors may include natural disasters, such as an earthquake or tornado; events or crises, such as a car accident or the diagnosis of a major illness; or interpersonal problems, such as a divorce, death of a loved one, loss of a job, or a problem with substance abuse.

Stress response syndromes usually begin within three months of the event or situation and ends within six months after the stressor stops or is eliminated. People with these disorders suffer severe disturbances or changes in memory, consciousness, identity, and general awareness of themselves and their surroundings.

These disorders usually are associated with overwhelming stress, which may be the result of traumatic events, accidents, or disasters that may be experienced or witnessed by the individual.

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